Giant road bike sizing charts

Giant road bike sizing charts.

Getting the right sized Giant bike frame that suits your body measurements is so important. We all come in varying sizes, shapes and proportions. Just because some of us are 6 foot tall, doesn’t mean we’re going to take an extra-large frame measurement.

There’s a range of bike frame measurements to consider: top tube length, handlebar stem length, saddle height, handlebar width, seat-handlebar drop, seat tube length, the crank length, the seat set back, the front of the saddle to the handlebars (reach), and the type of saddle.

We’ll be discussing fitting yourself to a Giant bike of course! Armed with the right information, you can minimise the injuries caused by riding a bike that does not fit your body proportions. Also, one of the additional benefits of riding the correct sized bike frame for your body fit is a healthy safe riding style, a performance boost and extra comfort.

YouTube Video’s on Bike Fitting here: www.youtube.com#correctly-fitting-yourself-to-your-bike

There are other things to consider apart from the actual size of the bike frame. Seat height, handlebar width, handlebar stem length and so forth.There are a few factors that determine the right size bike for you.

  • The length of your torso
  • The length of your legs (inside leg or inseam)
  • The length of your thigh
  • The size of your foot
  • The length of your arm
  • Your hand;and
  • The width of your shoulder

I’ll be providing more and more information on Giant bike fame sizing soon. In the meantime, there is a Melbourne (Australia) based cycle retailer called Cecil Walker Cycles (www.cecilwalker.com.au) who provides a service whereby they can fit you perfectly to a bike after years of applying their knowledge gained from selling and fitting thousands of customers to bikes. I’ve worked as a database designer and e-commerce designer for many years and I can only imagine what kind of data they have amassed over the years relating to customers size and bike frame ratios. What a goldmine of information!

Unfortunately, they are not resellers of Giant road bikes, but I’m sure they could provide this service for a small fee – or even better, they might get one in especially for you (I’d hope so!)

There are 3 different body types according to the American psychologist William Sheldon. He introduced the theory of somatypes. His theory described three basic human body types:

  1. the endomorph, characterized by a preponderance of body fat;small framed and thin and has narrow shoulders and hips.
  2. the mesomorph, marked by a well-developed musculatureconsidered to be a normal weight: not fat, not skinny, has shoulders that are wider than his hips; and
  3. the ectomorph, distinguished by a lack of either much fat or muscle tissueconsidered pear shaped meaning the hips are wider than the shoulders.

The chart below shows you at a glance the relationship between your height (and conventional frame sizing) and Giant’s Compact Road frame sizes.

Giant TCR Sizing Chart

Size

Measurement

Approx height range

Top tube length

XS

42cm

4ft 11 – 5ft 2

515mm

Small

46.5cm

5ft 2 – 5ft 6

535mm

Medium

50cm

5ft 6 – 5ft 9

555mm

Medium/ Large

53.5cm

5ft 9 – 6ft

570mm

Large

55.5cm

6ft  – 6ft 3

585mm

XL

58.5cm

6ft 3 – 6ft 7

610mm

 OCR Sizing

ize

Measurement

Approx height range

Top tube length

XS

48cm

4ft 11 – 5ft 2

515mm

Small

51cm

5ft 2 – 5ft 6

535mm

Medium

54cm

5ft 6 – 5ft 11

555mm

Large

57cm

5ft 11 – 6ft 3

575mm

XL

60cm

6ft 3 – 6ft 7

595mm

Giant SCR Sizing Chart

Size

Measurement

Approx height range

Top tube length

XS

43cm

4ft 11 – 5ft 2

510mm

Small

46.5cm

5ft 2 – 5ft 6

530mm

Medium

50cm

5ft 6 – 5ft 11

550mm

Large

55.5cm

5ft 11 – 6ft 3

575mm

XL

58.5cm

6ft 3 – 6ft 7

600mm

Giant FCR Sizing

Size

Measurement

Approx height range

Top tube length

XS

42cm

4ft 11 – 5ft 2

520mm

Small

46.5cm

5ft 2 – 5ft 6

535mm

Medium

50cm

5ft 6 – 5ft 11

550mm

Large

55.5cm

5ft 11 – 6ft 3

575mm

XL

58.5cm

6ft 3 – 6ft 7

600mm

Giant MTB Sizing Charts (Hardtail)

 

Size

Measurement

Approx height range

XS

14”

4ft 11 – 5ft 2

Small

17”

5ft 2 – 5ft 6

Medium

19”

5ft 6 – 5ft 11

Large

21”

5ft 11 – 6ft 3

XL

23”

6ft 3 plus

Giant MTB Sizing Charts (Full Suspension)

 

Size

Measurement

Approx height range

Small

16.5”

5ft 3 – 5ft 6

Medium

18.5”

5ft 6 – 5ft 11

Large

20.5”

5ft 11 – 6ft 2

XL

22.5”

6ft 2 plus

 

1. Sizing Yourself to Giant’s Compact Road Frame (TCR)To determine your Giant Compact Road bike frame size, measure your inseam in centimeters (crotch-to-floor measurement – no shoes, just bare feet!). The best way to do this is to stand with your back flat against a wall and your heels as close to the wall as possible. Next, take a hardback book that is approximately two inches thick and place it vertically as far up into your inseam as possible and so that the edge is flush with the wall and the top of the book is resting on the “crown jewels”.Be sure that the book protrudes enough so you can measure from the top edge of the book down to the floor. Next; Multiply the distance by .65 to determine conventional frame size (to convert inches to centimeters, multiply inches by 2.54). Find the equivalent Giant Compact Road frame size from the chart above.

2. Check For Proper Leg ExtensionTo complete this next measuring step, you must be wearing your cycling shoes with cleats on. It is best to have the bike stabilized in a trainer or lean against a wall while seated on the bike. Multiply inseam by .883 to determine approximate saddle height (measured from bottom bracket spindle to top of the saddle). With the ball of the foot directly over the pedal spindle and the crankarm at the bottom of the pedal stroke (6′clock) there should be a slight bend to the knee (approximately 30 degrees from completely straight). Adjust saddle height as needed. (See chart below.)

3. Set Saddle Fore/Aft Position.After determining the correct saddle height and leg extension, sit on your bike and rotate the crank so that the pedals are at 3 and 9 o’clock. When viewed from the side, the front of the knee should line up over the axle of the pedal. Obviously get someone to help with this!

4. Determine Top Tube/Stem Length Combination.With your hands on the handlebar’s lower “drop” position, there should be a slight bend to the elbows, with about 3-4 inches of distance between elbow and knee when the crank arm is in the 3 o’clock position. Also, with your hands in the drop position or on the tops of the brake levers (brake hoods), the middle section of the handlebar should obscure the front wheel’s hub from the rider’s view. If proper top tube/stem length combination cannot be achieved with a 105-135mm stem, try the the next size (larger) frame.

Handlebar height and saddle height should combine to position you with a relatively flat back when your hands are in the drop position. However, a more or less aggressive position can be achieved by using a flip-flop stem that has an angled arm. It may take a couple of rides with a couple of different stems to finally settle on the correct rider compartment fit.

I hope this information was helpful and I’ll be adding diagrams later to assist with the fitting explainations above. If in any doubt, you can take these instructions to your Giant dealer and make sure you get correctly fitted to your bike, if you have not already done so. Being comfortable on your bike is the secret to longer, more enjoyable rides with less energy wasted and a whole lot more smiles.

A few more links to resources for getting the right size frame to suit your own body size.

There is a lot of information out there regarding fitting yourself to the perfect frame, it makes all the difference. Rather than duplicate the content, here are some good links, well worth a read. Who knows. it may just save you some money and anxiety because you’ll probalby get the right size bike first time and not waste your money on a bike that’s either too big or too small.

Bicycling and Cycling reviews is a great resource and they have a good article on frame geometry fitting yourself to a road bike. Just apparell manufacturers, they all have their own sizes (try buying a shirt off the shelf and make it fit your body despite it being a M) so it pays to understand what to look out for when sizing yoruself to a new bike.

As with any piece of sporting equipment, there are pros and cons to look out for and there can be a lot of talk about top tubes, bottom bracktes, head tubes, seat tubes, frame angles, compact frames, wheelbase length, handling, stiffness of the frame etc. Sure, this is important, but like any sport, once you’ve experienced the basics and you decide to take it to the next level,then you can invest in the better gear.

http://www.epinions.com/content_951820420 hosts another great article on bike geometry and tells us that angle and dimension can affect ride quality! This article discusses the the head tube angle and the seat tube angle. The head tube is the bit where the fork and stem rotate and the seat tube is the tube where the seat post is inserted, in front of the rear wheel. The angles of these two tubes will help determine where the riding position will be and how body weight will be distributed over the bike.

The frame angles will help determine other important dimensions that affect your ride quality such as chain stay length, top tube length, and overall length, or wheelbase. it’s always helpful know your bike details before your purchase as well as well as judge your road bike on overall quality and components. Let’s face it, there’s a lot factors that will affect your riding experience. With so many angles and bikes to choose from, it’s good that manufacturers have given us all this option which allows you to find the perfect road bike that fits your needs. Whether that be riding hills or flat out on the straight bits.

Go down to your local bike store and test ride the bikes, but most importantly, get out there and ride like the wind and find out where the knobbly bits are on the bike and see if you can get a better fit and feel. Go to bikeforums.net for some great articles on all things cycling.

Here are more links on cycling fitting charts and information to help you get the right fitting bike:

http://bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=295925

- Wrist painhttp://bikeforums.net/showthread.php?t=242143

- Specialized Seat Bone measurerhttp://www.roadcycling.com/training/kneepain.shtml

- Knee painhttp://www.competitivecyclist.com/za…LCULATOR_INTRO

- Fit Calculator

http://www.coloradocyclist.com/bikefit

http://www.stlbiking.com/Bike_Fits.htm

http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-sizing.html

http://www.bike-manual.com/om/trekbi…g_the_bike.htm

http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm

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